Red Feather Scribe

Wilms Tumour photo WilmsTumour2copy_zpse9652544.png

Wilms’ Tumour is a cancer of the kidneys; it derives from specialised cells in the embryo known as metanephric blastema. These cells contribute to the development of the child’s kidneys while they’re in the womb and generally disappear at birth, but cells called nephrogenic rests can still be found in children with Wilms Tumour. Sometimes these cells begin to grow out of control, resulting in a mass of primitive, small, rapidly dividing cells called Wilms Tumour. This can affect only one kidney (unilateral) or both (bilateral).

Wilms’ Tumour is the third most common childhood cancer and accounts for 6–7% of childhood cancer cases. It is most prevalent in children between the ages of 3 and 4 years. It may spread to the liver, lungs, or nearby lymph nodes.

Various Types of Wilms Tumour:

  • Standard and Low Risk: The majority of tumours fall under this category and require less intensive treatment.

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